New Class: Sculptural Headpieces with Vintage Materials

In this one day class we will take a field trip to California Millinery Supply in Downtown LA to explore their wonderful back-stock vintage materials. You can choose to purchase vintage straw braid or crinoline to make a one of a kind sculpted fascinator, headpiece or flower crown. Once we have our goodies, we will meet up at my home to create our hand made pieces in my back yard studio. All notions and tools will be provided including vintage head blocks, millinery thread and needles, grosgrain ribbon and millinery wire.  Below are some of the styles I have made using straw braid and crinoline with the techniques I will be teaching. 

Price for Class: $150 plus materials you purchase at California Millinery Supply (aprox. $30)                                               Class Size: 4-6 (if it fills up we will schedule another soon)        

This class can be scheduled on any weekend day, contact me for possible dates.                                          

Hand Made Hats: Classes

Corina has been teaching free form hat making classes to milliners and novices of all ages since 2009. Corina has taught at various locations in the Los Angeles Area including: Cal State University LA, Machine Project, Echo Park and City of Santa Monica's Art Lab, Art Department Headquarters and Private Homes. Her teaching philosophy allows her students the freedom to create one of a kind pieces based on traditional and sculptural techniques. Corina encourages and assists her students to use their own inspirations and design instincts to create free-form  hats and headpieces in felt, straw and crinoline.  Below are some snap shots of student work. 

To arrange for a class to be held at your School or Facility please contact me

For individual students interested in taking classes: contact me with The subject: "Student" to to be notified of upcoming classes. 

Buster Keaton: Actor, Comedian, Hat Maker, Style Icon

Buster Keaton is known to have created his own version of a porkpie hat from a standard felt fedora. He would cut down the crown and flatten the brim to completely re-work the hat by hand. As the style was an integral part of the character he played in his films, he and his wife would make  multiples to withstand his clever stunts and feats of  physical comedy.  In an interview in 1962 he gave his recipe for sugar water which he applied to the hats to stiffen them to decrease ¨mortality.¨  When I learned about this story, I was struck with admiration for someone who could use his cleverness and style  in such a manner. I was inspired by his ingenuity in deconstructing a ubiquitous hat style to create something new and suited for his particular needs which would be associated with his iconic look for decades. 

My Process: The making of a Corina Haywood Hand Made Hat 'Montaña' Free-Form Blocked with Hand-Sculpted Crown

I had the opportunity to document my blocking process a few years ago with the photographer, Amelia Burns. She photographed me while making my Montaña Hat in fur felt. Here you can the steps from free form blocking, sculpting and hand sewing the grosgrain ribbon which go into making the finished hat. I have made this style in a variety of crown heights for men and women over the years. I have designed a mid-height version that is available in standard and custom sizes and a variety of colors in my shop. Below is the story of the my inspiration, research and design process for this style. 

The original idea for this style came after I made an over-sized hat with an tall, slouchy crown for a custom client.  I researched other men's and women's tall or deep crowned felt hats and found two 'slouch' hats that pulled my attention. One was from images of WW1 Australian Horse Infantry solders in their slouch hats which were made of heavy felt and had a sturdy brim to withstand battle and the elements. I liked the idea that these hats took on the the wear and stories of the soldiers. The other hat style that has the same name is the slouch hat popularized by Greta Garbo in the 1930's which she wore with masculine styled suits. My idea was to interpret both hat styles and make a slightly refined, softer version of the military hat with added sculptural forms. I wanted to experiment with sculpting forms that were intentionally geometric yet retained an organic and asymmetrical spontaneity.  This style is the product of those experimentation. I named the hat Montaña because the outline of the top of the crown remind me of the San Gabriel Mountains I have grown up next to. I have made Montaña in a variety of crown heights for men and women over the years. I  have  a mid-height version available in standard and custom sizes in my shop